JF Tree Specialist Blog A place to share knowledge and vision

Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 8 of 8)

Stereum gausapatum

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.50.43 Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.50.52

Hosts

  • Quervus spp. living tissue but common on many spp. dead branches

 

Significance

  • White rot of sapwood, extending to ‘pipe-rot’ of central wood
  • Initially a ‘ring-rot’ in early wood vessels
  • Extensive total degradation
  • Extensive decay – small branches may fail, larger trunks limbs may not, high target, fell and inspect wound further.

 

Ident Features

  • Resupinate thin, skin layer
  • No pores or gills
  • Upper –rich brown maturing darker and turning red if cut
  • Lower – hairy grey/brown if white margin

 

 

Stereum hirsutum (Hairy Leather Bracket)

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.51.38 Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.51.16

Hosts

  • Quercus spp., other broadleaves

 

Significance

  • Confined to dead/dying branches
  • Not major hazard

 

Ident Features

  • Tiered bracket fronds
  • Upper – hairy, dull yellow
  • Lower – bright yellow/brown

 

 

 

 

Stereum rugosum (Common Leather Bracket)

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.52.02 Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.52.16

Hosts

  • Corylus, Betula, Alnus, Quercus rubra spp.

 

Significance

  • Not major hazard EXCEPT Q. rubra
  • Q. rubra, canker rot at stem base-inspect

 

 Ident Features

  • Similar to H. gausapatum but yellow/buff upper and wrinkled brown lower
  • Bleeds red

 

 

 

Stereum sanguinolentum

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.52.27

Hosts

  • Picea spp., other conifers

 

Significance

  • Extensive discolouration then intensive white rot
  • Fracture hazard uncertain

 

Ident Features

  • Grey/ochre skin like appearance
  • Bleeds red
  • Old wounds but commonly or end of felled timber

 

 

 

 

Chondosterum purpureum (Silver Leaf Disease Fungus)

Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.52.36 Screen Shot 2015-10-07 at 01.52.45

Hosts

  • Betula, Acer spp., Roseaceae, Eucalypts, other broadleaves

 

Significance

  • Killer of trees
  • Enters wounds and kills sapwood, causing water-conducting malfunction
  • Toxin, in some spp., manifests in leaves, turning them dull lead colour – silver leaf
  • White rot decay of sapwood
  • Secondary colonisation by Coriolus versicolor common- causing structural failure

 

Ident Features

  • Hard, tough, skin like fronds
  • Upper – hairy, pale grey/brown
  • Lower – lilac/purple maturing grey
  • Can re-imbibe moisture after desiccation

 

 

 

 

<< PART 7 OF 8

Drop a comment