Tree Specialist

Apple-Tree

Apples & Pears Trees

FORMATIVE PRUNING OF BUSH TREES

Formative pruning is essential and should be carried out in the dormant season, November- March. Its purpose is to produce a well-balanced tree with a strong branch framework capable of carrying heavy crops of fruit. Hard pruning is therefore carried out in the early

years to produce strong growth instead of fruit. If formative pruning is not carried out the tree will tend to be weak, of poor shape with drooping branches and bare wood. Pruning in later years should be lighter to encourage fruiting.

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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 8 of 8)

Stereum gausapatum

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Hosts

  • Quervus spp. living tissue but common on many spp. dead branches

 

Significance

  • White rot of sapwood, extending to ‘pipe-rot’ of central wood
  • Initially a ‘ring-rot’ in early wood vessels
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 7 of 8)

Pholiota squarrosa (Shaggy Scale-Head)

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Hosts

  • Ulmus, Sorbus aucaparia

 

Significance

  • Basal decay
  • Examine for decay or root killing
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 6 of 8)

Daldinia concertina (Kings Alfreds Cakes)

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Hosts

  • Fraxinus spp, less common on deciduous trees

 

Significance

  • White rot
  • Zonal degrade ‘calico’
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 5 of 8)

Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom)

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Hosts

  • Fagus, Aesculus, Populus spp

 

Significance

  • Early delignification in springwood
  • Cracking across grain in Populus
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 4 of 8)

Rigidoporus ulmarius

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Hosts

  • Ulmus, occ. Acer, Quercus & Populus spp

 

 

Significance

  • Brown cubical rot
  • Loss of tensile strength
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 3 of 8)

Armillaria mellea (Honey Fungus)

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Hosts

  • Broadleaves and conifers

 

Significance

  • White rot
  • Windthrow, syptomatic with crown dieback
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 2 of 8)

Phellinus igniarius (Grey Fire Bracket)

Grey Fire Bracket

Hosts

  • Salix, Betula spp. some other broadleaves

Significance

  • Soft textured White rot
  • Yellowish-green, dark discoloration zone
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Principle decay causing fungi in trees (part 1 of 8)

Phaeolus schweinitzii (Pine Dye Polypore)

Phaeolus schweinitziipine dye polypore

 

 

 

Hosts

  • Various conifers esp. Pinus spp.

Significance

  • Root, butt and heartwood decay fungus
  • Decay begins in the roots where a primary infection by Armillaria spp. appears to pave the way for colonisation
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The Sycamore tree

Tree myths. The Sycamore

Sycamores are weeds

Introduced to Britain from Europe sometime during the middle Ages, they spread rapidly and colonised new areas. It has always been reviled by some because of the limited number of species that it can support, as well as it’s ability go grow and so spread quickly, thus blocking out the chances of more native species to prosper. It lets little light through to the forest floor, and its sticky fallen leaves can sometimes make it hard for under story plants to establish themselves.

In some parts of the country it is routinely removed ‘syci-bashing’ in favor of more wildlife friendly trees such as Oak, Ash and Hazel.

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